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 July 29, 2017, deputies from the Clatsop County Sheriff's Office, officers from the Seaside Police Department, and the Warrenton Police K9 team executed a search warrant at the residence at 1226 E Avenue, Seaside, Oregon. The search warrant was granted based upon information received and developed through a coordinated drug trafficking and child welfare investigation by the Sheriff's Office and the Seaside Police Department.

Not even close might best describe the building design submitted to Astoria Community Development for a new Dollar General Store the company is proposing for a triangular piece of property in the Uppertown area. The corporate standard design submitted to the city doesn’t meet the development code intended to guide future construction intended to enhance Astoria’s eastern entrance and provide pedestrian-friendly storefronts.

 

Coast Guard crews aided a 67-year-old mariner after his yacht collided with an unknown object and sank 9 miles off Leadbetter Point State Park, Washington, Friday.

An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Astoria hoisted the mariner from his yacht tender and safely transported him to the station where he was checked by emergency medical service personnel.

The Oregon Health Authority issued a health advisory today for Coffenbury Lake, located at Fort Stevens State Park. Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of blue-green algae that can produce toxins in Coffenbury Lake that can be harmful to humans and animals.

People should always avoid areas with visible scum that looks foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red. When swimming, ingestion and inhalation exposure can occur are discouraged. Swallowing or inhaling water droplets as a result of these water activities in areas where a bloom has been identified or an advisory issued, can expose people to the toxins that can be produced.

Drinking water directly from Coffenbury Lake at this time is especially dangerous. OHA Public Health Division officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters.

                       

As an estimated 80,000 locals and tourists taste samples at the 30th annual Oregon Brewers Festival in downtown Portland this week, cows in Astoria will be enjoying the spent grains from one of the participating brewers. 

This story began more than 10 years ago when dairy feed costs started soaring in the wake of the U.S. ethanol mandate. Dirk Rohne of Brownsmead Island Farm near Astoria, Oregon, had one of those "what if" moments. 

What if he could use a byproduct generated by the beer brewing process at nearby Fort George Brewery as feed for his 170 cow dairy? 



The multi-million dollar linear particle accelerator (LINAC) has arrived at the CMH/ OHSU Knight Cancer Institute collaboration treatment center in Astoria which itself is nearing completion.

On July 22nd, 2017 at about 5:15 PM, Officer Nicole Riley stopped an s10 pickup truck for operating without insurance.  The driver of the vehicle did not provide identification and was detained for Failure to Carry and Present a Driver's License.  The driver was identified as 29-year-old Michael Konecny of Astoria.  Konecny was wanted for a parole violation warrant and was found to have a criminally suspended driver's license.  As a result, he was taken into custody.  During a search of Konecny, a large amount of cash, as well as syringes, were found in his possession.  Konecny was lodged at the Clatsop County Jail on the warrant and suspended license charge.

Poor community relations highlighted by a demonstrated lack of compassion for the neighborhood it operates in may mean the Astoria Warming Center (AWC) will have to find a new home. Responding to citizen concerns the Community Development Department stepped in and determined the center must have a conditional use permit and satisfy a number of conditions to continue operations in its church basement location.

President Donald Trump is barring transgender people from serving in the military "in any capacity," citing "tremendous medical costs and disruption." Trump's announcement Wednesday morning on Twitter did not say what would happen to transgender people already in the military.

Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici issued the following statement 

 “I am incredibly proud to have met so many Oregonians, including committed transgender service members who have served our nation honorably. The President’s decision to deny them the opportunity to serve goes against the values that our military fights to protect. Turning our backs on these transgender individuals is discriminatory and unacceptable. We overturned Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell more than five years ago, and military experts have reported no negative effects. In fact, forcing troops to hide who they are and denying them health care services could diminish the effectiveness of our military. I urge the Defense Department to continue to accept the transgender servicemembers and their families who are faithfully serving us.”

Oregon Employment Division Regional Economist Erik Knoder keeps track of employment numbers for each county every month and reports that for Clatsop County seasonally adjusted payroll employment was unchanged in June at 18,200 jobs. Rates of unemployment remain low which is expected to continue to present issues for local employers looking to fill positions both full time and part time.

 

A multi-year study of the marbled murrelet, a threatened West Coast seabird that nests as far as 50 miles inland, aims to discover the animal’s habitat needs and understand the reasons for the species’ ongoing population decline in the Northwest.

In addition, to determine the needs of this elusive bird, the study aims to help forest managers on public and private lands balance habitat conservation with timber land management.

The project is possible because of an increase in funding for research in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University provided by the state Legislature in 2015 with broad support from the timber industry and conservation groups. “We are investing in this project because all interests want to know the breeding habitat requirements of the marbled murrelet so that land management decisions in our coastal forests benefit from the best data and science available,” said Thomas Maness, dean of the college.

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