Friday, July 25, 2014

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, Fort Clatsop will be hosting a workshop and evening presentation by Dr. Jamie Strange. The recent pesticide kill of over 50,000 bumble bees in Wilsonville, Oregon captured the headlines for the dramatic numbers and the preventable nature of the tragedy.  But what affect, if any, will this event have on bumble bee populations? On Monday, July 22, 2013 Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, Fort Clatsop, will be hosting two programs examining the decline of bumble bees in North America.

A bumble bee identification and survey workshop from 2 PM to 5 PM will be held at Netul Landing. The workshop will focus on basic bumble bee biology, identification and monitoring strategies enabling land managers, citizen scientists and biologists to evaluate the health of bumble bee populations. The workshop will be divided into three parts: bumble bee biology, identification of bumble bee species, and survey techniques and data collection. The workshop is free of charge; however space is limited to 12 individuals. To make a reservation, contact Carla Cole at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  or (503) 861-4443.

At 6 PM the park will host an evening public presentation by Dr. Strange, in the Netul River Room of the Fort Clatsop Visitor Center.  Dr. Strange has surveyed bumble bee populations for six years across the western United States in response to reports of declines of some species. While pesticide kills are dramatic, some even more alarming trends have come out of his surveys.

Dr. James "Jamie" Strange is a Research Entomologist with the USDA- Agricultural Research Service in Logan, UT at the Pollinating Insect Research Unit.  Dr. Strange specializes on issues related to bumble bees, especially the management of bumble bees in agricultural settings and issues related to the conservation and genetics of declining species. Dr. Strange has surveyed bumble bee populations for six years across the western United States in response to reports of declines of some species. He received his Ph.D. from Washington State University where he worked on the conservation genetics of honey bees. His 2012 publication, A Guide to the Bumble Bees of the Western United States, co-authored with Jonathan Koch and Paul Williams, was recently named a notable government publication by the American Library Association.

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